July Nature Happenings

  • NABA National Butterfly count.
  • Prothonotary Warblers start to leave for Central and South America in late July after nesting here.
  • First brood of immature hummingbirds begin to show up at nectar feeders early in the month.
  • Mississippi Kites begin fledging their young.
  • Except for goldfinches and late bluebirds, bird breeding and nesting season ends this month.
  • Garter snakes give birth to live young.
  • Mallards and Wood Ducks molt into their "eclipse" plumage and are unable to fly for several weeks.
  • Fall migration starts this month with returning shorebirds.
  • Blackbirds begin to flock and appear at feeders.
  • Katydids and Cicadas are in full chorus by the mid-month.
  • Listen for the feeding screeches of young Barred and Great Horned Owls.
  • Butterfly and Dragonfly diversity peaks.
  • Butterfly milkweed in bloom. Look for Monarch Butterfly adults, eggs and larva.
  • Delta Aquarids Meteor shower peaks in late-July.

June Nature Happenings

  • June is Perennial Garden Month & National Rivers Month
  • Hummingbirds are attracted to the orange flowers of Trumpet Creeper vines when they bloom.
  • Look for Teasel and Field Thistle blooming in open areas.
  • Bird migration is finished. Birds that are here now are summer residents that nest.
  • As the month progresses, feeders can become busy with visiting parents and fledglings.
  • House Wrens are nesting in the northern part of region.
  • Eastern species (Cerulean Warbler; Scarlet Tanager) are breeding at their western limit in the Ouchita Mountains of eastern Oklahoma.
  • Snapping Turtles emerge onto land to lay eggs.
  • Drought conditions often prevail; a freshly-changed bird bath will draw in a variety of birds.
  • Young raccoons emerge and venture out with their mothers.
  • Bullfrogs begin calling.

May Nature Happenings

  • Over 250 species of wildflowers bloom this month in our fields and forests.
  • Dark-eyed Juncos disappear early in month.
  • Peak of warbler migration happens very early in month.
  • The first half of the month is peak migration for flycatchers, thrushes and northerly vireos.
  • Nighthawks and Chimney Swifts return.
  • Sub-adult Purple Martins return to establish new colonies early in month.
  • Peak of bird courtship. Listen for the morning chorus.
  • Nesting materials are being collected.
  • Orioles return and begin nesting. Be sure to have their feeders, nectar, fruit and jelly out early.
  • The first fireflies of the year can be seen.
  • Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Wood Duck and Mallard ducklings hatch and venture forth early this month.
  • Eta Aquarids meteor shower is early-May.
  • International Migratory Bird Day is mid-May.

April Nature Happenings

  • Project FeederWatch ends this month, www.birds.cornell.edu/pfw
  • Baltimore Orioles arrive early this month. Be sure to have their nectar feeders ready.
  • Prothonotary Warblers arrive early this month from their wintering grounds in Central and South America.
  • Listen for the subtle "Pee-O-Wee" call of the Eastern Wood-Pewee upon its return.
  • Whip-poor-wills arrive in the first half of the month.
  • Chuck-will’s-widows start to arrive in the last week of the month
  • Last of the Whooping Cranes depart Aransas NWR by the middle of the month.
  • Free-tailed Bats return from Mexico.
  • Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks arrive at inland breeding sites.
  • South winds bring major waves of migrating birds such as southern-breeding warblers and vireos in the first half and more northerly species in the second half of the month.
  • Painted Buntings begin to arrive late in the month.
  • Lyrids meteor shower, late-April.
  • Earth Day, April 22.

March Nature Happenings 

  • Project FeederWatch continues, www.birds.cornell.edu/pfw
  • Snow Geese depart early this month.
  • Blue-winged Teal return this month for the summer to raise their young.
  • Listen for the subtle "Pee-O-Wee" call of the Eastern Wood Pewee upon its return.
  • Wintering gulls reach their peak population on the Gulf Coast early in the month.
  • Peak of spring waterfowl migration.
  • Screech Owls are sitting on their eggs.
  • Cardinals begin nesting.
  • Hummingbirds can arrive early in the month. Be sure to have their feeders ready.
  • Whooping Cranes begin to leave the Texas coast.
  • Bluebirds begin nesting by the end of the month. Be sure to have their houses ready.
  • Goldfinches begin to molt into their brilliant yellow plumage.

February Nature Happenings

  • Great Backyard Bird Count, mid-month, www.birdsource.org/gbbc
  • Project FeederWatch continues, www.birds.cornell.edu/pfw
  • February is National Bird Feeding Month
  • Look for early-returning Ruby-throated Hummingbirds during the last week of February.
  • Eastern Cottontail mating season.
  • American Woodcocks are doing courtship flights.
  • American Robin spring migration begins in late February.
  • As days lengthen, Tufted Titmice and cardinals begin to sing.
  • Sandhill Cranes can be seen migrating north in late February.
  • Hibernating butterflies (Morning Cloak, Comma) emerge on warm days.
  • Have houses ready for mature Purple Martins that will return by end of the month.
  • Smith's Longspurs will be on their way back to the Arctic by the end of the month.
  • Bluebird and other nest boxes need to be cleaned out this month.

January Nature Happenings

  • Project FeederWatch continues, www.birds.cornell.edu/pfw
  • Look for Pine Siskin and Purple Finches at your feeders.
  • Look for our three over-wintering warblers – the Pine, Orange-crowned and Yellow-rumped.
  • Eastern Box Turtles will spend the winter hibernating in a shallow burrow, often no deeper than a few inches.
  • During warm spells, some reptiles and amphibians can become active.
  • Now through late March is a difficult time for birds; providing food and an open source of water is important.
  • Prolonged freezes are really tough on wrens. Suet can be a lifesaver for them.
  • Coastal Louisiana hosts many wintering hummingbirds that need a reliable source of nectar.
  • During late January or early February, Great Horned Owls will be sitting on their eggs.
  • During the first or second week of January, the first returning Purple Martins will be seen along the coast.
  • Squirrel mating season.
  • Aldo Leopold's (Father of Wildlife Conservation) birthday Jan. 11
  • Quadrantid Meteor Shower early in the month. See up to 60 falling meteors per hour!